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Andrey Eremenko

Drafted into the army during WWI. In 1918 joined the Red Army and 1939 led Cavalry Corps into eastern Poland as part of operations agreed between Germany and the Soviet Union.

Andrey Eremenko

Drafted into the army during WWI. In 1918 joined the Red Army and 1939 led Cavalry Corps into eastern Poland as part of operations agreed between Germany and the Soviet Union.

There was shooting throughout the night. A few Red Army soldiers and commanders were killed. Comrade Ponomarenko was in Novogrudok during this restless night and ordered the local authorities and punitive organs to ensure order in the town, which was done.

There were fights with Polish forces in several locations.

A difficult situation developed in terms of fuel supply, resupply didn’t keep up with the pace of our progress. The supply at the district headquarters was very bad. There were no local resources, the shelves didn’t have motorized tank parts and they didn’t built up any inventory. Therefore, I was forced to take the following measures: make two working tanks from three existing tanks, filled with fuel, and leave the third tank in place without fuel waiting for fuel to be delivered. We carried out this difficult work of transferring the fuel from tank to tank overnight in the forest in total darkness. See more

It is damp and raining off and on. The area around the town is low and swampy.

Last night, I drove past the troops in a trophy car that had just been seized.

At 10:00am, the First Secretary of the Executive Committee of the Communist Party of Belarus, Comrade Panteleymon Kondratevich Ponomarenko arrived, and brought with him a member of the regional Military Council, Comrade Susaikov, a very unpleasant person: slanderous, unsympathetic, uncaring, basically a big “bourbon”. By this time, counterrevolution had begun to rear its head in the city of Novogrudok and its surrounding areas (at first it was dumbfounded by our sudden blow).

18:00

I gave an order as the garrison chief of the town of Navahrudak. In the order, I demanded that local authorities and citizens maintain order, shops continue their business as usual; the Soviet ruble is now equal to the Polish zloty. I gave an order to surrender weapons and military equipment. All Polish officers have to register with the city executive.

Yesterday, the commander of the Belorussian Military District, Comrade Kovalyov, Commander of the Second Rank, held a meeting with the high command of the corps, which took place in Uzda in the town’s theatre. The meeting was top secret. Comrade Kovalyov announced at the meeting that a government decision had been made that we will take action to liberate the western regions of Belarus which are under Polish control. Comrade Kovalyov asked us commanders to ensure that the troops display iron discipline and order; so that the divisions, soldiers and officers would be loyal towards the population. The strongest measures should be used to stop looting and other manifestations which could disgrace our army.

Throughout September 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, corps divisions remained in occupied areas and were engaged in studies, mainly conducting tactical preparations: they practiced a head-on battle, an offensive, reconnaissance, shooting, defence of the field, etc.

During the night of September 15, according to my special instructions, the cavalry corps troops, with a wide front, approximately 30 km wide, approached the Polish border near Negoreloye, all while remaining in strict disguise.

In this way, the troops secured an initial, preliminary position, without getting too close to the border.